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Posted by on in Abortion and Women's Health
Emotional Effects After Abortion

I feel concerned about women after abortion, particularly after hearing very emotional and negative experiences from women.   I looked at a review on mental health and abortion by the American Psychological Association's Task Force on Mental Health and Abortion.  Overall, their conclusions seem to reflect how women are usually coping and getting on with their lives.  But surprisingly, this important review failed to conclude on the risks of emotional effects after abortion and effects on the general mental health of women.

The 2008 American Psychological Association's - APA Task Force on Mental Health and Abortion (TFMHA) reviewed 223 USA and International studies published in peer-reviewed journals from 1990-2007 and gave its findings in a 100 page report.1 Firstly, the TFMHA defines "mental health" using the World Health Organisation's (WHO) definition of mental health as: "a state of well-being in which the individual realises his or her own abilities, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to his or her community."  All the women I know appear to satisfy this definition of "mental health" after abortion.

Then the TFMHA explains that the question of whether abortion causes harm to women's health cannot be scientifically tested.  This would require randomised trials where pregnant women are assigned to an abortion verses delivery verses adoption group and this is obviously not desirable nor ethical.  So the (testable) questions addressed by the TFMHA were how prevalent are mental health problems among women in the U.S. who have had an abortion and what is the relative risk of mental health problems after abortion compared to alternatives (adoption or motherhood).

The TFMHA specifies mental health problems for an important reason - it emphasises that "mental health problems" are defined as "clinically significant disorders assessed with valid and reliable measure of physician diagnosis."  Examples include, major depression, anxiety disorders or postraumatic stress disorders.  Excluded from the definition of mental health problems are 'normal' negative emotions or feelings a woman might experience after an abortion and as the TFMHA states, these include regret, sadness or dysphoria.2  "Dysphoria" (psychiatry) means: a "state of unease or generalised dissatisfaction with life", or "an emotional state characterised by anxiety, depression or unease."3

So the TFMHA review on mental health and abortion was largely limited to drawing conclusions on mental health problems after abortion where mental health problems are clinically diagnosed mental disorders in women.  Although the TFMHA did review papers that analysed relative mental risks (i.e. including emotional effects) associated with abortion, it rejected all the studies as being unable to provide unequivocal evidence on these, due to "methodological flaws".

The conclusion of the TFMHA was, "the most methodologically sound research indicates that among women who have a single, legal, first-trimester abortion of an unplanned pregnancy for nontherapeutic reasons, the relative risks of mental health problems is no greater than the risks among women who deliver an unplanned pregnancy".

Not surprisingly, this conclusion seems to reflect the women after abortion I know - they had a single, legal, early abortion and seem to be doing fine as capable and successful women without any psychological disorders.  However these women have experienced a very deep and personal, ongoing sadness and regret after abortion.  These significant adverse effects on the psychological well-being of women after abortion were not well-addressed by the TFMHA because it would not use studies that included evidence on emotional effects to make a conclusion.

The TFMHA gave a conclusion of the relative risk of "mental health problems", i.e. mental health disorders only: their conclusion does not address concerns about the relative risk of abortion on the general mental health of women, including adverse emotional effects.  As I discuss in "Planned Parenthood's Misleading Claims on Mental Health and Abortion", unfortunately abortion providers and services, such as Planned Parenthood and government websites in Australia and the U.S. ignore this narrow conclusion of the TFMHA and instead use it to make claims that abortion does not cause emotional effects.  This is very misleading to women considering abortion and fails to acknowledge the women who do suffer adverse affects and are in need of care and support from their health care providers and communities. 

 

Are you suffering emotional effects after abortion?  You can find help in your area using our online directory or guide or call now:

24 Hr Helpline: 1800 090 777 (Aus)

or

24 Hr International Helpline:

866 482 5433 (USA)

(exit code) 1 866 483 5433 (Intl)

 

1 TFMHA - Task Force on Mental Health and Abortion (2008). Report of the APA Task Force on Mental Health and Abortion. Washington, DC. American Psychological Association Task Force on Mental Health and Abortion. http://www.apa.org/pi/women/programs/abortion/mental-health.pdf

2 TFMHA. 2008. Report of the APA Task Force on Mental Health and Abortion. Washington, DC. American Psychological

Task Force on Mental Health and Abortion.   http://www.apa.org/pi/women/programs/abortion/mental-health.pdf

  p.7.  "..it is crucial to distinguish between clinically significant mental disorders, such as major depression,

generalised anxiety disorder, or posttraumatic stress disorder, and a normal range of negative emotions or feelings

one might experience following a difficult decision, such as feelings of regret, sadness or dysphoria.  While the latter

feelings may be significant, by themselves they do not constitute psychopathology."

 

3 http://www.thefreedictionary.com/dysphoria

 

 

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Posted by on in Problems In Pregnancy
I Just Needed To See My Baby

Our baby girl was conceived summer of 2013.  Our 2nd baby.  We thought, wow.  Our first baby – a boy. Second baby – a girl.  I made it a point to keep myself active by keeping up with our 20-month old’s playgroups, etc. regardless of how heavily pregnant I got.  It was the only way I could get exercise and I promised that this pregnancy won’t compromise our toddler’s activities.  

But then, on my 6th month of pregnancy, anxiety slowly crept in.  Countless questions started to drown me.  A baby girl?  How do you take care of a baby girl?  I seem to have been able to manage with a boy, but that’s just one child - but with 2 children?  And a girl?  How?  I tried to draw in childhood memories but none of them consoled me: authoritarian parents, physical work, smacking, not enough cuddles/kisses, siblings I barely knew because we were torn apart, my eldest sister having an unplanned pregnancy and eloping with boyfriend, etc.

My toddler’s Health Visitor seemed to know our family quite well. And so, at one of his appointments, she asked me, “How are you mum?” And I thought, “I have no one to talk to.  I have to tell her.  Now.  I broke down.  I told her that I wasn’t very happy.  That, I was burdened with worries.  That, I didn’t know how to take care of a baby girl.  She was genuinely sympathetic and tried to raise my self-esteem.  At the same time, she tried to dig a little into my story.  She said that she can refer me for mental health support – but she kindly asked me if I would like her to handle my case and conduct the first assessment.  I agreed.

After a week, she popped by our flat and we had a little chat about my family history, my childhood, my husband, and how I was managing with a toddler whilst heavily pregnant.  Going through the details with her was impossible without crying.  She was with us for an hour and perfectly understood why I felt that way and quickly decided to refer me to a clinical psychologist (CP).

Probably on the same week, at our toddler’s bi-weekly playgroup, one of the children’s centre staff approached me and asked me how I am and the baby.  I related to her what I’ve been going through and the home visit that we have just had.  She quickly told me that she can get help for me and asked me to stay for a bit after the playgroup so she can fill-out a referral form for me.  I received a call from Compass Wellbeing UK after about a week or so.  I was told that I would be seen by a CP.  I went through an assessment with the CP and she scheduled me for weekly counselling (about an hour each) until I felt that I no longer needed it.  

Early February 2014, I called my CP and told her that I won’t be able to attend the sessions anymore as I was already having difficulty moving around.  She was very supportive and said to call her back whenever I felt the need to see her.  The sessions with the CP were difficult as I had to unload my feelings every time.  But each session taught me how to handle my emotions, gave more clarity to who I am, and the future of our new baby.  

Here are some of the very important pointers that I got from her:

1. As a new parent / every pregnancy can bring back childhood memories. Both the good and the bad.

2. Do not put undue pressure on yourself and expect to bond with your baby after birthing. For some mothers, this is a slow process – but is still considered normal.

3. Your child’s life will be completely different from yours.

4. Give yourself some credit.

5. Try and sit with someone you trust, e.g. husband, partner or friend, and talk more about your feelings.

6. Go out and join groups, e.g. parenting groups / playgroups, and make new friends.

Through the advocacy of my Birth Doula (I found her through Doula UK), the consultant agreed to perform a Natural Caesarean (ironically, this was also an Emergency C-Section as baby did not engage and was swimming in three litres of water). As soon as the medical staff brought the curtain down, I burst into tears. There she was, my lovely baby girl.  A few days after I gave birth, I called my CP to update her and told her, “I just needed to see my baby.”

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Posted by on in After Abortion
Finding common ground on abortion

Leah Torres MD and I tweet each other often about abortion.  Leah asked what my thoughts were on a blog she wrote called 'Universal Truths'.  Although Leah and I sit on either side of the abortion debate, I am confident in saying that each of us are genuinely happy when we can find common ground on issues relating to abortion and can simply agree.

So when I read her blog I was pleased to say that I did agree with all the main points of her blog, which Leah refers to as 'universal truths':

1. Everyone wants fewer abortions.

2. Abortions will always be needed.

3. When abortion is legal and accessible, it is safe.

However, I wanted to respond in detail to Leah's discussion on each and share some different views on each point and also make some suggestions.

Everyone wants fewer abortions.. how true.  Leah aptly describes how scary and difficult it is for a woman to face an unexpected pregnancy.  "She never wanted to consider having an abortion .. yet not everything.. works out the way we plan..Thus, what I mean by "everyone wants fewer abortions", is that beginning with the woman who is facing an unplanned pregnancy, everyone wants fewer abortions."

Leah stongly urges comprehensive sexual health education and access to highly effective contraception in order to lower the rate of abortion.   I agree education and access to a variety of effective contraception methods that people feel comfortable using, for health or religious reasons too, are important to avoid pregnancies.  However, as Leah says, 'no birth control method is perfect'. There will always be unexpected pregnancies even with good sex education and use of contraception.  We must look at other ways also to lower the rate of abortion.  What first sprung to my mind, there could be much better support in our communities for women that specifically address the problems many face in an unexpected pregnancy, rather than just offering one solution: abortion.

Leah mentions a woman must consider her health, her family situation, her financial situation.  These are important points.  Good maternal health services are critical to ensure all women can enjoy healthy pregnancies and deliveries.  But unfortunately, even in developed countries such as the United States1, maternal health is not consistently to the high standard it should be nor is prenatal care available to all women (either because available care is poor or it is too costly).  Women should not have to pay for ultrasounds or to give birth in a hospital.  This directly impacts the health of women in pregnancy and any risks she might experience in continuing a pregnancy.  Improving maternal health services (particularly in hospitals) and ensuring all women can receive a high standard of prenatal care through universal health care would have a direct and positive impact on lowering pregnancy risks for many women.

A woman in unexpected pregnancy also considers her family situation: this would include her relationships with her husband/partner, any children and probably her parents too.  The situation she finds herself in and relationships with those closest to her may have great influence on whether a woman feels she can continue a pregnancy or not.  But what happens if she is unsure she really wants an abortion but is unsupported by her parents or partner?  Without support she feels she will not cope.  What if she knew she could get the support she needs elsewhere?  Would she feel then she could continue the pregnancy?  Quality, accessible services like personalised care in an unexpected pregnancy, relationship counselling, pregnancy and parenting support services (including home visits) can give women who would otherwise feel they have no other choice but abortion due to lack of support, a real choice to continue in the pregnancy.

Also Leah mentions the financial situation for a women.  In many places, this is the number 1 reason women have an abortion.  Is there another solution?  Yes, financial help can be a solution and, not just temporary financial help in pregnancy but well into the future.  For many women, giving birth comes with the financial responsibility of raising a child.  What financial support is offered mothers in your area?  If a single mum has to take time off paid work because of pregnancy and to care for a child, could she get by?  Can she afford to provide for the child?  What about a student or dependent - is there any help for them in an unexpected pregnancy?  What about the mother with two young children already who is the main breadwinner in the family?  Is there financial support available if she can't work for months and months?  Unexpected pregnancies lead to the possibility of an unexpected financial crisis for many people.  It is for times like this that I think a broad social welfare net and financial support of women and families in need in our communities is completely justified.

Also importantly there should be financial support for women who choose adoption over abortion. They should not have to struggle to pay for regular visits to the doctor or to receive prenatal/materal care and may need financial support for time off work due to the pregnancy.  Adoption is a very difficult decision and women should be well supported with free specialised support, particularly counselling, both before and well after an adoption.

There are of course many complex and personal reasons why a woman may consider an abortion.  Here we've just discussed a few but I think we should look at the main rasons why women seek abortion and consider 'are there other solutions to these reasons and are women being offered these solutions as well as abortion?'  If not, why not?

Abortions will always be needed.. I agree with that too, for certain kinds of abortions.

First, to be clear, by 'abortion' we are referring to an 'induced abortion' and not a miscarriage (medically called a 'spontaneous abortion').  "Abortion" is the deliberate ending of a pregnancy before an embryo or fetus is viable (capable of surviving outside the womb).  This is the standard medical definition of an abortion.2  However, abortions occur after viability also, well into the 2nd or 3rd trimesters and although these may be called a 'late termination of pregnancy' or a 'delivery' or a 'birth' by the medical community, they are nevertheless still what is generally understood to be an 'abortion' if the intention of the procedure is to produce a nonviable fetus.

The U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in collecting data on abortion in the USA, defines legal induced abortion as:

"a procedure, performed by a licenced physician or someone acting under the supervision of a licensed physician, that was intended to terminate a suspected or known intrauterine pregnancy and to produce a nonviable fetus at any gestational age."3 (emphasis added)

There are differences in the aim of some abortions.  A procedure may be performed to deliberately end a pregnancy but the aim of the abortion is not to cause the death of the embryo or fetus but to treat the mother.  Charles Camosy, philosopher and a professor of social ethics, refers to abortions as either direct or indirect depending on whether the procedure aims at the death of the embryo or fetus.4  I find this a helpful distinction between different kinds of abortions.

A direct abortion aims at the death of the embryo or fetus.  Procedures that are always direct abortions (by their very nature) are vacuum aspiration and dilation & extraction (D&E) abortions.

An indirect abortion does not aim (as an end or by its method) at the death of the fetus (although this may be likely or inevitable).  Procedures that may be used to perform an indirect abortion are an induction of labour, removing the uterus (hysterectomy) or the abortion pill, RU486.  (RU486 arguably causes the embryo to detach from the woman without directly attacking the embryo itself). It is important to note that these procedures are not indirect abortions, however, if the aim of the procedure is the death of the embryo or fetus.

The abortions I agree will always be needed are indirect abortions for reasons such as ectopic pregnancy or pre-eclampsia or other medical conditions (such as cancer of the uterus), as a last resort.  Medical situations when a pregnancy poses a very serious threat to a woman's life and health and there is no alternative method of treatment other than an abortion are rare.

Leah submits that abortions will always be needed by women who receive news later in pregnancy that her child has a life limiting diagnoses and will either die before birth or shortly after delivery.  Also that abortion will always be needed for women whose health is placed seriously at risk due to a pregnancy in the second and third trimesters (perhaps jeopardising future pregnancies).  I disagree an abortion will always be needed for pregnancies where the child has a life limiting diagnoses, however an indirect abortion may be needed later in pregnancy if a woman's health is at risk.  What is definitely needed and is often lacking today is personal and specialised care to help parents confronted with the news their child has a life limiting diagnoses and through a very difficult time.

When abortion care is legal and accessible, it is safe.. well I mostly agree with this statement but partly disagree too.  Not all legal abortions are safe for women.  More than 400 women are known to have died from legal abortions, since abortion was legalised in the United States in 1973.5  The risk of death from a legal abortion significantly increases each week from very early in a pregnancy. Available data on abortion-related deaths from 1988-1997 in the U.S. showed that, after 8 weeks of pregnancy, the risk of mortality increases by 38% each week.6  So what is a "safe" abortion?  Since a pregnant woman can only continue in pregnancy or have an abortion, I think it is reasonable to say that by "safe", we are talking about how safe it is in comparison to giving birth.  In the period 1988-1997, per trimester, the risk of mortality in abortion was 14.7/100,000 at 13-15 weeks pregnancy, 29.5/100,000 at 16-20 weeks pregnancy and 76.6/100,000 after 21 weeks pregnancy.6  During 1988-1997, the risk of death in childbirth was approximately 8-10/100,000.1  So in the 2nd and 3rd trimester, the risk of death from legal abortion exceeded that of childbirth.

Hence I would have to qualify that I agree abortions early in the first trimester of pregnancy when legal and accessible, are safe.  Also any necessary medical procedure performed by a qualified medical practitioner in a hospital or approved facility will of course be much safer than one performed by an unqualified person or without a regulated standard of care.

How do we reduced the need for abortions?  I would like to add to Leah's answer to provide comprehensive sex education and highly effective methods of contraception with a few more suggestions: provide free, high standard maternal care, including hospital delivery; welfare support for pregnant women and children after birth; counselling, social and psychological support services available both during and after an unexpected pregnancy; social change for non-discrimination of pregnant women at school, college, in the workplace and in public facilities.

I thank Leah for inviting discussion on this important topic and I hope others will join in constructive discussion and efforts towards the change everyone wants.. fewer abortions.

 

 

1 Kilpatrick SJ. "Next Steps to Reduce Maternal Morbidity and Mortality in the USA."  Medscape, Women's Health. 2015; 11(2): 193-199 http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/842588. Introduction:

"Maternal mortality in the USA, after a dramatic fall from 900s/100,000 live births in the early 1900s, largely due to the advent of antibiotics, plateaued at 8-10/100,000 from 1980 until the late 1990s at which point maternal mortality rose.  Worldwide between 1990 and 2013 maternal mortality increased in nearly every country, except the USA, where it increased by 1.7%."

2 Annas GJ, Elias S. "Legal and Ethical Issues in Obstetric Practice." 2007. 51:

"[T]he standard medical definition of abortion [is] termination of a pregnancy when the fetus is not viable." 

3 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Abortion Surveillance - United States, 2007", Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 60, no. 1 (February 25, 2011), p.2. Available at  http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/ss/ss6001.pdf

4 Camosy, C. "Beyond the Abortion Wars. A Way Forward for a New Generation" 2015. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co. p. 64-65, 81.

5 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Abortion Surveillance - United States, 2007", Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 60, no. 1 (February 25, 2011), p.36. Available at  http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/ss/ss6001.pdf

6 Barlett LA, Berg CJ, Shulman HB, Zane SB, Green CA, Whitehead S, Atrash HK. "Risk factors for legal induced abortion-related mortality in the United States." 2004; Obstet Gynewcol 103: 729-37. Available at http://www.researchgate.net/publication/8648767_Risk_Factors_for_Legal_Induced_AbortionRelated_Mortality_in_the_United_States

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Posted by on in After Abortion
Sibling Saturday

Pregnancy And Infancy Loss Awarness (PAILA) Month is just a few weeks away! And while that’s still technically a lot of time, I am kinda freaking out! I just feel so strongly about this cause that I want to get the word out to as many as possible, as quickly as I can, so there are more events than ever planned this year, in as many places as possible.

One thing that happens consistently, is the International Wave Of Light which takes place at 7pm (in all timezones worldwide) on the 15th of October. It may seem simple, but it’s actually very powerful. In addition, many plan walks/runs, balloon releases, memorials and such occur on, or around that day.

This is all wonderful, bringing comfort and healing to many. But I would love to see more aimed specifically at siblings. It is a ‘special’ kind of pain that we endure. Even though there are several causes of early sibling loss (abortion, miscarriage, illness, injuries, SIDS, etc) we face some common issues. Among them, reluctance to voice our feelings and pain, for fear of adding to our parents’ pain. I know that one far too well in my own life, which is why it took about 6 years to start looking for other sibs or speaking to others.

We also oftentimes end up adopting the secret. We are let in on the fact that there was a loss but are not supposed to mention it outside the family, and sometimes even within. Sadly, I think in most cases this only delays healing, for ourselves and for others. I mention the others because sometimes just knowing someone can relate to our pain leads to comfort and healing. Suddenly, we don’t feel as alone anymore!

The last issue I will mention for now, is that plenty of times the siblings are asked how the parents are doing (not a bad thing.. but it’s painful when the siblings are not also checked up on) and/or are told to be strong for the parents. While I know it’s not done with malicious intent, the latter frustrates me! After my dad died, I decided on my own, to ‘be strong’ for my mom and really it’s taken quite the toll. You can read a little bit in my reflection on emotional repression. I hate thinking of just how many can relate, whether through their own choices or being forced into it.

Despite the struggles with repression, which I’ve dealt with most of my life, I have still managed to find significant healing! But not through a recovery program or therapy that others have suggested I needed. Rather, through communicating with those who can relate. Also by participating in the arts. I never imagined that drawing, coloring, writing, music, rock art, etc could lead to such healing, especially since I did not feel skilled in these areas.

I want to do all in my power to make it so that others are able to experience that type of  healing as well. The great thing is that it can work for people of all ages, religions, political views, etc and end up uniting people, who were previously divided.

Recently, I came up with an idea that combines pregnancy/infancy loss awareness, sibling pain AND art therapy! I've called it 'Sibling Saturday', and it will be held on the 4th Saturday in October. An event where grieving siblings from all backgrounds would have a chance to get to know each other while working on memorial art of different types (writing, drawing/coloring, crocheting/knitting, etc). Those who so desired could share their stories in a safe, judgement free environment. My goal is to see that Sibling Saturday takes place anually, in as many locations as possible, worldwide. Including with a way for the homebound siblings to participate. If you are on facebook and would like to join in the planning, host an event, get more info/updates, etc, feel free to join this group. If not on facebook, but still interested, let us know in the comments and we will see what we can arrange.

Whether you are able to participate or not, I hope this post has made you more aware of the suffering siblings, and given you some ideas on how to reach out to them. If you, yourself are a sibling, I hope this has brought some comfort to you and you’ll be able to take part in events just for us, sibs! May any needed healing come to you and your families. You will be in my thoughts and prayers.

 

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On Planned Parenthood: How I was Almost a Victim of Big Business

This article originally appeared on the author's site, 1Shiksayisrael on July 24, 2015.  Republished with permission.

 

I feel like I have aged a thousand years since June 15, 2015.  That is the day videos were released that showed a sting on illegal practices at Planned Parenthood.  I have been agitated, upset and at unease since they aired.  I have hardly slept and my mind has become troubled. 

I am troubled because me and my baby almost became victims of Planned Parenthood.  I say victims correctly because I feel like a victim of rape or molestation due to Planned Parenthood's unethical practices.  I have come to see that Planned Parenthood is an abuser like any other.  They use shame, manipulation and deceit like an abuser.  An abuser of women, babies and souls.  I should tell you of my experience with them.

Ten years ago I was a Federal Officer with a new house and a new relationship.  Things were going pretty good.  Then one day I found out I was pregnant.  My boyfriend's initial joy soon changed to worry for finances.  He just didn't think we could handle a baby.  Over the next week, Rob wore me down to having an abortion.  I just couldn't handle the pressure of losing everything for a baby.  I called Planned Parenthood and I must tell you, I was never counselled about adoption.  I wasn't emotionally counselled.  I was told to come in and have an abortion.  I was told it was a painless, easy procedure and best for the baby too.  They said my baby wasn't a baby but a blob of tissue without feelings.  They said it was a mercy to abort my baby.

I asked about having an ultrasound but I was told my baby was too small and it was a waste of time. I made the appointment for the next day.  I couldn't get my baby out of my mind so I called my regular doctor and he said he could fit me in for an emergency ultrasound if I hurried. I got to the hospital and I laid down on a cold, sterile table.  The technician didn't know I was going to have an abortion the next day.  She showed me my baby.  His heart was beating like a hummingbird's.  He was moving.  I looked at his heart beat and I couldn't kill him.  I just couldn't kill my baby.

I started to cry and the technician seemed to understand my thoughts.  She left and I cried on that cold table because I was all alone.  Then I remembered, I wasn't alone.  I had a little person with me and God.  I went outside and in tears told Rob that I wasn't going to kill our baby.  He said he would leave me and he did.  I gave birth without him and I cut my baby's cord alone.  I named him LeModre which is Spanish for "The Mother", because I brought him through Hell and back.

My baby is beautiful and not life unworthy of life.  He is my beautiful treasure and a gift from God.  When I see these Planned Parenthood videos I almost vomit, I almost throw myself to the ground.  What had I almost done?  What had Planned Parenthood made easy and pressured me to do?  I feel traumatized since I saw the truth of Planned Parenthood.. They are the worst human beings on Earth.  They make money off of people's problems and turn innocent life into meat for a corporation's sell as if they were a cattle farm..

If you're a mother unsure of what to do, please know that it won't always be like this.  God gives us trials to make us strong.  Please choose Life because Death never answered anyone's problems.  I want to encourage pro-lifers to keep encouraging and counselling women.  Corporations like Planned Parenthood are here to snuff the Light of God from this earth and we will answer in Paradise for our actions.  God bless you! 

I

 

 

 

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